Classes

PSY 1576

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

Social psychology has documented many surprising features of the human mind, providing robust evidence that people deceive themselves, are systematically overconfident, believe implausible things to avoid inconsistency, and so on. Explanations often focus on proximate psychological mechanisms (e.g., we avoid inconsistency because we find it uncomfortable). But behind every proximate mechanism is an ultimate explanation (why is inconsistency uncomfortable?)—why did evolution or learning lead us to be this way?

PSY 1575

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

Why do our ideologies change when we are put in positions of power (e.g., victim dehumanization), or subordination (e.g., Stockholm Syndrome), or with peers with a different opinion (e.g., conformity)?Why are our moral and political ideologies so different across time and culture (e.g., the ideologies of ISIS members compared to Americans)? Why do we claim that our morals are logically justifiable when we cannot justify them (e.g., moral dumbfounding)? This course will explore the hidden incentives that can explain these and many other puzzling features of our beliefs and ideologies.

ECON 1057

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2016

Game theory is the formal toolkit for analyzing situations in which payoffs depend not only on your actions (say, which TV series you watch), but also others' (whether your friends are watching the same show).  You've probably already heard of some famous games, like the prisoners' dilemma and the costly signaling game.  We'll teach you to solve games like these, and more, using tools like Nash equilibrium, subgame perfection, Bayesian Nash equilibrium, and the one-shot deviation principle.Game theory has traditionally been applied to understand the behavior of highly deliberate …

MATH 243

Semester: 

Spring

Offered: 

2016

Advanced topics of evolutionary dynamics. Seminars and research projects.

Recommended Prep: Experience with mathematical biology at the level of Mathematics 153.

HEB 1390

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

We will apply an evolutionary framework - with the help of models from "game theory" and "evolutionary dynamics" - to explain social behavior typically considered the realm of psychologists and philosophers, such as why we speak indirectly, in what sense beauty is socially constructed, and where our moral intuitions come from.

ECON 1053

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

People give a lot: 2% of GDP is donated to charity, 2-4% of hours worked are volunteered, and 50% of Americans vote in National Elections. Yet such giving displays puzzling qualities: for example, giving is often inefficient (consider the efficiency of Habitat for Humanity) and people who would otherwise give will pay to opt out of being solicited.

MATH 153

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2015

Introduces basic concepts of mathematical biology and evolutionary dynamics: evolution of genomes, quasi-species, finite and infinite population dynamics, chaos, game dynamics, evolution of cooperation and language, spatial models, evolutionary graph theory, infection dynamics, somatic evolution of cancer.

Pre-requisites: Math at the level of Math 19a, Math 21a, Applied Math 21a. Familiarity with programming and basic probability highly recommended.